Museum guests invited to view unique artifacts

A Cannon found in Southeast Alaska brought out of the lower levels of the Museum of the North for visitors to see.

Pattering of feet and squeals of delight sounded through the halls of the Museum of the North for its annual open house on Jan. 27.

Upon entering the building guests were directed to a booth where the UAMN Curiosity Club gave guests a chance to enter a drawing for the chance to win a year membership. Anyone who was not a student filled out a form to add it to the bin with the hopes of winning. At the booth guests could also find details of other activities that would take place throughout the day.

The open house held this Saturday made time for a special activity in the museum, opening doors not normally open to the public. Attendees were ushered behind the scenes to see the shop where employees build display cases. Sneak peeks of upcoming exhibits were given, and guests were allowed down to the lower level where staff showed off some of the archaeological artifacts kept off the display floor.

The Museum of the North has the biggest archaeological collection of Alaskan artifacts. Items in possession have come from all over Alaska. One of the pieces brought out for visitors came from Southeast Alaska. It was a dilapidated cannon, which staff believe is from the 17th century.

There were refreshments in the auditorium where they played a slideshow of items both on display and not. The slides showcased how various, mesmerizing displays of art were created.

The craft room contained various activities for children that allowed them to interact with art and science. One station gave kids the chance to create their own aurora with chalk, which seemed to be the most popular. Another showed kids how magnets worked and different ways in which they would react by twirling around a magnet stick, which held little bits of magnet in a type of viscous liquid.

For more information on future open houses, interested parties can check out the museum’s website http://www.uaf.edu/museum/.

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